Small business owners and investors: a playbook for 2016

Most investors are wondering whether the madness that is currently being experienced in the stocks market will ever come to an end. Small business owners may wonder too since stability might eventually mean a change in interest rates is coming, which will affect how much money is paid back on money borrowed from a bank. Most of them are seeking to exit given that the Standard and Poors 500 index has seen a drop of approximately 7% since the year started. However, the current trend ought to be your friend contrary to the beliefs of many. Forbes contributor, Brett Owens, believes that this should be the time to buy stocks that you can keep for years to come.
There are several dividend stock opportunities that you can buy-and-hold and increase your portfolio’s value. Some of these stocks will be able to cushion you from the blows delivered by the daily fluctuations in the market. They can also offer a hedge over the download turbulence being experienced.

You should always capitalize on the available opportunities. Warren Buffet advises that “opportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, you should put out the bucket and not the thimble.” Warren meant to say that these opportunities are always available for those who are aggressive and also patient. Opportunities always come around only once in a blue moon. Just like a deer hunter knows their chance only comes along once and when they do they are short-lived, and he should strike fast. In the stock market context, when the market declines it does not spell doom but rather that good companies are available for the cheap.

It is obvious that any investor would want a stock that is stable and strong with the prospect of generating returns year in year out. However, these kinds of stocks are most of the stocks in the market as their returns are smaller when compared to the stocks that do not pay dividends. Dividend stocks have a simple value in your portfolio, and that is serving as a benchmark to evade the downward pressure of markets. Dividend stocks also provide you with an investment capital that you could use to invest in additional stocks.
They provide investors with a win-win situation. In a recent Ned Davis Research, which was cited by a report from Hamlin Capital Management, showed dividend stocks return since 1972. It was found that they returned 9.3% on average against a 2.6% return for the non-dividend stocks. You should, therefore, look at adding the blue-chip dividend stocks that are available now at these low prices. If you don’t know where to look, then you can check dividend investing strategies used by some investment communities (for example, see http://www.philstockworld.com/2016/05/14/best-way-for-buying-options-of-stocks-for-monthly-dividend/) or you can look at the listed examples below to see what you should be on the lookout for.

Consider Wells Fargo & Co.
There many things to like about this company. Even Warren Buffet has invested in it, at 19% to be exact. Owens asserts that Wells Fargo is the top stock holding of Berkshire Hathaway. The questions that may linger in an investor’s mind would be why people love it and why it is a bargain buy now. Its recent drop can be attributed to its contact to the energy sector. When this sector collapsed, Wells Fargo also dropped by 3.5%, but it has done little to unsettle investors. This is so as it only has energy companies comprising around 2% of its loan portfolio.

When its total deposits and average loan numbers are considered, they were found to have grown by 6 percent and 7 percent respectively. Traders have recently noticed the strength of Wells Fargo. It remains to be one of the top multinational banks in America and you can’t help but not miss that there is a branch in nearly every town you visit in the USA. It has impeccable efficiency ratios at 57.4% whereas the rest of the banking industry stands at 68.7%. The lower number is great as it stands for costs as a certain percentage of the revenue.

Other reasons include its recession-proof in the last few years. It has paid dividend payouts that have surpassed by 650% since the financial crisis of 2008. The bank has a P/E ratio that is 10.5 now, which is well above the JPMorgan and Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America that are the industry titans. Its model for the future will make it profit from the interest hikes from the Fed. They have also doled out a large number of loans than any other banks and their low exposure and correlation to China makes this dividend worth taking to the bank.

Takeaway: Dividend Stocks are the Best
Wells Fargo is just an example of a dividend stock of a blue chip company that is low in value now, and there are also several others. Zack’s report considered this as a perfect example of why investors need to buy dividend stocks. The recent S&P 500 Index fall has made analysts believe that the entire index is heading towards bearish territory. It has dropped 10% meaning that it is the right time to buy the dividend stocks of blue chip companies that are available at affordable values.

Hello world! It smells like mahogany

“Novel scent” is a thing in the perfume world, like sandalwood or vanilla. In the past few years, tons of products have appeared in the marketplace to give a person or a place the earthy smell of a rare book collection.

Perfumer Christopher Brosius ’s makes body scent and your house like that. The high-end scent Paper Fire promises to capture the “unique olfactory delights of the newly printed publication,” though for about $200 per bottle it’s a lot more economical just to purchase a newly printed book.

The allure of books that have an `old’ scent was examined in depth. Wood-based paper includes lignin, a substance closely associated with vanillin, the compound that gives its scent to vanilla. As the compounds and the pages age breakdown, they discharge that trademark aroma.

Original article is behind the link. You can make a market (and money) in anything. Even the smell of old books. And new cars. I’m waiting for one in that ‘new electronics’ smell.